#boeddhanatuur

alles ineen

Posted on aug 16, 2018

When we discover the Buddha that we are, we realize that everything and everyone is Buddha. … When we regard thoughts and emotions with humor and openness, that’s how we perceive the universe.

Pema Chödrön

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niets bijzonders

Posted on feb 4, 2018

Now, this buddha nature that we talk about is not something mysterious or arcane. Buddha just means “awake,” “one who is awake.” So we find out how to align ourselves, how to be awake and to align ourselves with our true intention, with our true being, with the wisdom and compassion that is already inherent in each being, including you. You are not the one single exception to the fact that all beings are buddhas. You are not that exceptional.

Zenkei Blanche Hartman

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stoffige zachtheid

Posted on okt 22, 2017

“The Buddha’s view of home leaving is summarized in these words: ‘Household life is crowded and dusty; life gone forth is wide open. It is not easy, while living in a home, to lead the holy life.’ …  We need to regard the Buddha’s first teaching about ‘life gone forth’ carefully; we need to be careful about cutting off both human feelings and relationships. Practicing nonattachment is not the same as practicing detachment. The former practice addresses the human selfishness we bring to all of our relationships and is guided by the relinquishing of self-clinging to reactions that arise. The latter is repressive and disconnected and seeks to keep our delusional selfcenteredness intact by avoiding intimate relational contact and feelings.

Furthermore, the description of family life as ‘crowded and dusty’ might encourage some to think that holiness is found elsewhere than that dustiness. Somewhere, other than right where we are, there is an ideal practice life that is dustless. Somewhere there exists a life pure and elevated from the dust of human family relations. Imagining this to be true is a serious mistake, and sadly not an uncommon one. While each of us needs to find quiet time to reflect on our true nature, it is important to see buddha-nature reflected even in our most annoying family members, relatives, and associates. If we cannot do this, our practice develops a puritanical, precious, detached, and heartless quality.” – Grace Schireson

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3 delusions: opinion, emotion and speech

Posted on mei 5, 2017

“Tōzan said*: … ‘there are three kinds of lingering delusions. They are the lingering delusions of opinion, emotion, and speech.
With lingering delusions of opinion, one can’t separate himself from the domain of the thinking mind and hence falls into the poisonous ocean.
With lingering delusions of emotion, one always looks at things from the standpoint of the intellect, becoming narrow-minded and biased.
With lingering delusions of speech, one loses sight of the wonderful teaching of the true nature of things and becomes blinded to its true activity. Please consider these three lingering delusions carefully.’
One who has not yet exhausted these lingering delusions will be stained by the two aspects — existence and emptiness — and will not find freedom anywhere.”

Bassui Tokushō (1327–1387)

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